Contents

When building a custom AR-15 upper receiver , installing your barrel is actually one of the easier things to complete. Make sure and read the article that covers what tools you will need to build your AR-15 upper receiver and then grab the following items: your barrel, your barrel nut, torque wrench, barrel nut wrench and AeroShell 33ms grease . This shows how some may choose to place the barrel directly into the vise.

How to Build an AR-15 Upper Receiver Barrel

How to Build an AR-15 Upper Receiver  BarrelWhen building a custom AR-15 upper receiver , installing your barrel is actually one of the easier things to complete. Make sure and read the article that covers what tools you will need to build your AR-15 upper receiver and then grab the following items: your barrel, your barrel nut, torque wrench, barrel nut wrench and AeroShell 33ms grease . This shows how some may choose to place the barrel directly into the vise. This image is taken directly from the technical manual. If you decide to install your own barrel into your AR-15 upper receiver, it is important to make sure your upper receiver is well supported to be able to withstand the stress it will have to endure when you’re torquing down the barrel nut. In the image to the left from the technical manual I use, you can see that you may also opt to place your barrel directly in the vise. However, if you are not careful, you could damage your barrel significantly. I have used an u pper receiver vise block in the past without issues, but I have since obtained a Geissele Reaction Rod which I am more confident using and will continue to use in the future. With that said, let’s get your upper receiver or barrel secured in a fashion you are comfortable with, and lets get that barrel installed, shall we? Step 1: Coat the inside of the upper receiver and the outside of the barrel extension generously with AeroShell 33MS. This will prevent corrosion and will aid with ease of installation of the barrel into the upper receiver. Pay close attention to line up the index pin on the barrel with the notch on the upper receiver. Step 2: The tolerances of both your upper receiver and barrel extension may vary, but the barrel should fit nice and snug. It may take quit a bit of hand strength to get the barrel into the upper receiver all the way. You may need the assistance of a rubber mallet, but do not strike the barrel; you will have to tap the rear of the upper receiver with the barrel secured in place in the vise. Step 3: There are many types of rails and barrel nuts available on the market. For my build, I used a Wilson Combat TRIM rail . The TRIM rail uses a specific barrel nut and requires the use of a crow’s foot to install it. The process is the same for most every barrel nut, so don’t worry if you’re installing a different rail. Liberally apply AeroShell 33MS grease to both the threads of the barrel nut and the upper receiver, slide the barrel nut over the barrel, and hand tighten the nut. Using the torque wrench and barrel nut wrench, torque the barrel nut to 30 foot pounds. More than likely, exactly 30 foot pounds will not allow for proper gas tube alignment with the barrel nut, so I typically “season the threads” by tightening, loosening and re-tightening the barrel nut a few times. Continue to check for proper gas tube alignment that is specific to your barrel nut. This generally means that when the barrel nut is timed correctly, the gas tube will be able to move straight and without hangups through either a notch or hole in the barrel nut and into the upper receiver. Once you torque the barrel nut to the initial 30 foot pounds, set the torque wrench for 80 foot pounds and continue to tighten the barrel nut until the correct timing is achieved. More than likely you will not reach the mil-spec cut off of 80 foot pounds before the barrel nut is properly timed. If you do end up reaching the 80 foot pound limit and your gas tube alignment is still no good, you may have to use a shim. This is what my upper receiver build looked like with the barrel installed and the barrel nut correctly timed. My barrel nut only took approximately 55 foot pounds, but each barrel nut is different. Be sure to check back next week for when I explain how to install the gas tube into the gas block and install it on the barrel.

Inside the National Firearms Museums Petersen Collection

Inside the National Firearms Museums Petersen Collection

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d36c357d_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d36c357d_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } A view of Bob Petersen’s gun room. Cased sets were located in the drawers below the main display counter. The NRA’s National Firearms Museum, established in 1935, proudly boasts a collection of nearly 6,000 firearms and twice that number of accoutrements and related items. The overwhelming majority of the "National Firearms Museum" ’s holdings have come from the more than generous contributions of members, friends, and industry. Recently, a gift from the estate of Robert E. Petersen, of Los Angeles, to the National Firearms Museum set a record in philanthropy to the National Rifle Association (NRA), with a nearly $20 million gift, the largest in the 140-year history of the NRA. The National Firearms Museum’s Robert E. Petersen Gallery is 2,000 square feet and contains 425 of the finest American and European firearms. Through the generosity of Mr. Petersen’s widow, Margie Petersen, 425 firearms from his lifelong collection of historic, rare, and extraordinary sporting arms were given to the National Firearms Museum, with the only requirement being that anything gifted to the museum must be displayed. The National Firearms Museum staff proudly opened its newest exhibit, The Robert E. Petersen Gallery, to the general public on October 8, 2010. The opening marked the culmination of Petersen’s dream of sharing his extraordinary collection of firearms with the world. The collection is on permanent display at the National Firearms Museum, where it will be preserved for the education and enjoyment of future generations. Husband, father, veteran, publisher, restaurateur, outdoorsman, automobile enthusiast, philanthropist, and friend are all words that partially describe Robert E. Petersen. Born in 1926, in Barstow, California, he proudly served in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II. Following his service in the war, he started a hobbyist magazine for car racing enthusiasts titled Hot Rod . From that initial venture he built the Petersen Publishing empire that included 39 monthly periodicals by the time he sold the company, in 1996. Related GunDigest Articles Photo Gallery: RIAC September Premier Firearms Auction Preview 5 Reasons to Own Survival Firearms Photo Gallery: Sneak Peak at James D. Julia's Firearms Auction Petersen published a number of iconic American magazines including Hot Rod , Guns & Ammo , Sports Afield , Petersen’s Hunting , and Motor Trend , just to name a few. He hunted on nearly every continent and was credited with being the first person to ever take a polar bear with a .44 Magnum handgun. (Both the revolver and the bear are on exhibit in the National Firearms Museum.) He also served as Commissioner of Shooting Sports for the XXIII Olympiad, held in 1984, in Los Angeles. This Colt Model 1883 Gatling Gun is marked “U.S. Navy” and is thought to be the only surviving example complete with its original naval deck mount. Pete, as he was called by his friends and his wife, Margie (1936- 2011), first established a relationship with the NRA’s National Firearms Museum in the early 1990s, when they loaned a substantial part of his antique Colt’s collection for display. Since that time, the National Firearms Museum has always been fortunate to exhibit priceless treasures from Pete’s personal collection. It was through Margie’s vision and generosity that the National Firearms Museum’s’s 2,000 square-foot Petersen Gallery was made possible. While every firearm selected for exhibit is exceptional in its own way, notable highlights include: • Largest collection of fine double rifles on display to the public. • Exceptional collection of high-end double barrel shotguns. • Largest Gatling gun collection on public display (10 Gatlings). • Guns owned and used by noted individuals such as Annie Oakley, John Olin, Robert Stack, Julian Hatcher, John F. Kennedy, Hermann Goering, and Elmer Keith. While the collection is broad and varied, if there is a pervasive theme, it is that of the finest sporting arms in the world, including those by gun makers such as Beretta, Boss, Holland & Holland, Purdey, Fabbri, Galazan, Westley Richards, Parker, Browning, and Rizzini. “The Empire Gun” by Holland & Holland is a 28-gauge Holland Royal, featuring gold inlay by Allan M. Brown. It is thought to be the most exquisite Holland & Holland in the Petersen collection. Of special inclusion in the Petersen gift are the world-renowned Parker Invincibles—considered by many to be the finest and most valuable set of American-made guns in existence—a “baby” Paterson revolver, and the Grover Cleveland 8-gauge Colt’s double-barrel shotgun. The Parkers and the Colt 8-gauge have been on loan to the museum since 2001. Ken Elliott, a personal friend of the Petersens for over 45 years and an employee for 35 of those years, was Vice President and Executive Publisher of Petersen Publishing’s Outdoor Division at the time the company was sold in 1996. After attending the gala opening of the museum gallery, he remarked that, “The Petersen Gallery is indicative of the man. It is what he was all about, from showing the guns he loved to shoot to the finest guns ever created. The gallery is about the man and his passions.” The Nock Volley Gun is a .46-caliber seven-barreled English sea service arm used during the age of Admiral Nelson. This original behemoth was used by Richard Widmark in his role as Jim Bowie in the 1960 John Wayne film The Alamo. The Colt New Frontier was named after JFK’s 1961 Presidential Inaugural address. This is one of two Colt New Frontiers that were made as presentation pieces to the thirty-fifth President. Garry James, another personal family friend and former employee of Petersens, and who now works as the Senior Editor of Guns & Ammo magazine, was a close confidant to Bob Petersen and someone the publisher relied upon for advice and knowledge, when it came to selecting an antique firearm for potential acquisition. Garry recalled recently, “It was a sincere privilege to work for Mr. Petersen and to be able to help him build his extraordinary collection. From 1971 until his unfortunate and untimely passing in 2007, it was always interesting and a great deal of fun to play a role in assembling what, by many accounts, is certainly one of the most historically significant and remarkable private firearms collections ever assembled.” He added, “The Petersen Gallery at the "National Firearms Museum’s" is a fitting tribute and executed in a manner that would have made both Bob and Margie feel that their legacy is in caring and appreciative hands.” This Colt Detective Special “Vampire Hunter” revolver was engraved by Leonard Francolini at the Colt factory. Sterling sliver bullets with carved vampire heads complete the ensemble. The Robert E. Petersen Gallery replaces the National Firearms Museum’s’s former introduction and orientation space, with a dazzling array of 15 display cases that highlight more than 400 rifles, pistols, and shotguns, as well as his collection of Gatling guns, the famous Colt’s display boards from 1918, and the spectacular Harrington & Richardson 1876 Centennial display board. This gallery is now a permanent fixture of the museum and is open to the public daily from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. "The National Firearms" Museum is located at 11250 Waples Mill Road in Fairfax, Virginia. There is no admission fee. For more information about the National Firearms Museum’s, visit www.NRAmuseum.com . This article is an excerpt from Gun Digest 2013. NEXT STEP: Download Your Free Storm Tactical Printable Target Pack 62 Printable MOA Targets with DOT Drills - Rifle Range in YARDS This impressive target pack from our friends at Storm Tactical contains 62 printable targets for rifle and handgun range use. Target grids and bullseye sizes are in MOA. Ideal for long-range shooting! Get Free Targets

MIRA Safety: Portable Geiger Counter Review

MIRA Safety: Portable Geiger Counter Review

Advertisment MIRA Safety is one of the premier manufacturers of protective gear designed for the military, police, firefighters and first responders that may have to risk being exposed to hazardous conditions and materials and their portable Geiger counter does just the job. Their big sellers are their CBRN gas masks that are used by Mil/LEO customers all over the world, as well as private citizens looking to be prepared in case of riots, natural disasters, terrorist attacks, and other similar events. MIRA Safety Outfitted After their excellent gas masks, one of their most popular products is a pocket-sized Geiger counter/dosimeter that’s small enough to fit in your pocket, has an automatic and custom-set alarm, and is cheap enough that almost anyone, from serious preppers to casual EDC nerds, can pick one up for their emergency kit. Contents Radiation Exposure Risks and Why You Should have a Geiger Counter/Dosimeter Radiological and Nuclear Threats Overview of the MIRA Safety Geiger Is the MIRA Safety Geiger-1 Worth It? Parting Shots These devices all anyone to measure both background radiation exposure (how much the device and its user are currently exposed to) and how much the device has been exposed to in total (dose). I’m always interested in preparedness products that address modern threats such as the risk of radiation exposure, and this is a great way to help protect yourself from that….if it works. At $150, which is a good bit less than most Geiger counters, I had to try it out. Let’s talk about radiation exposure risks, why we think a device to protect yourself from radiation exposure is so necessary, and whether or not the MIRA Safety Geiger-1 is capable of keeping you and your family safe from radiation, be it from an industrial or workplace accident, or even a nuclear attack. "Radiation Exposure Risks" and Why You Should have a Geiger Counter/Dosimeter I know what you’re thinking…why the hell do I need a pocket-sized Geiger counter? Living in the world we do, it really does pay to be prepared for everything you can. That’s why most of us carry guns, right? So we can be prepared to defend ourselves from a variety of threats. But what about threats we can’t stop with a gun ? Wildfires like those that are currently ravaging California, the deadly hurricanes that have devastated parts of the Caribbean, and the recent earthquakes that caused so much damage in Japan…a gun doesn’t do a whole lot to keep you safe during these types of events This last incident caused a secondary effect: a nuclear power plant meltdown that displaced almost 200,000 people, potentially exposing them to radiation. If these incidents have done anything, they’ve proven that relying on the government, any government, for our safety, isn’t necessarily the best idea. That doesn’t mean the government is evil, or malicious, or even incompetent though. I don’t want to get political about this. MIRA Safety Gas Mask But the reality is that governments have to be responsible for all their citizens, and sometimes the simple mathematics means that some of us are going to have to fend for ourselves during a natural disaster, riot, terrorist attack, or what have you. If I’m going to be cut off from backup, I want to be as self-sufficient as possible, and that means being prepared for every threat I can. Which, in the world we live in, includes radiological material. This is not meant to have you living in fear of a nuclear or radiological incident, but we carry guns, learn first aid/trauma medicine, and keep smoke detectors and fire extinguishers in our homes because those are real steps we can take to combat real problems. Radiation exposure is no less of a threat if it happens, but thankfully you can be just as prepared for it as for a fire in your kitchen, or a mugging at the ATM. Radiological and Nuclear Threats Short of an actual nuclear attack, there’s the risk of a damaged reactor failing due to earthquakes, fires, floods, or even a terrorist attack, as well as the risk of a dirty bomb . We also ship over 20 million truckloads of nuclear/radiological material on the highway every year, and sometimes those trucks have accidents. Almost two-thirds of Americans live within 50 miles of a nuclear power plant, and who knows how many of us live near a military base or secret government launch site with nukes and don’t know it. Beyond that, there’s hazardous industrial waste, radon leaks , and even some natural sources of radiation. Plus there’s the danger faced by anyone working in an industry that uses radiological materials and devices that produce radiation. Without a dosimeter or other warning device, an industrial or commercial accidents can easily lead to excessive radiation exposure in these fields, and goooood luck getting insurance to cover any cancer you may get a few decades down the line if you don’t have some kind of evidence of exposure. Even if you think your employer has proper radiation shielding in place, doesn’t it still make sense to double-check independently? Finally, if you travel a lot, you might be in countries that have nuclear power plants or even nuclear weapons or industrial runoff that you could be inadvertently exposed to and never even realize it unless you have this portable Geiger counter by your side. The Fukushima Daiichi reactor incident in Japan proved that even modern, industrialized nations with thriving industries may have lax safety standards around their nuclear power plants, so having a small, compact device that you can throw into a bag and forget about until you need it seems like a practical consideration. And remember, you can’t see radiation. You can’t smell it. You can’t taste it. The only warning you’ll have is maybe some nausea now, and then a vastly-increased risk of cancer later. Overview of the MIRA Safety Geiger The MIRA Safety Geiger is, on paper at least, exactly the device you would want to have to protect yourself from radiation. It’s about the size of a large pen, and it’s simple enough that almost anyone can use it. It measures both current radiation exposure, and overall dosage, and it does so with the same accuracy as professional lab-based devices that are much larger and much more expensive. It uses the same Geiger-Muller tube (SBM20-1) that many larger and more expensive devices use, and it reads with the same accuracy that many regulatory inspector devices do. MIRA Safety Geiger Counter The device itself is 1”x5” and weighs under 2oz, so it really is something you could slip into an EDC pouch, glovebox, carry on, or even just into your pocket and forget about it until you feel the need to check something. And when you’re checking something, it takes just 20 seconds and is sensitive enough to detect the radiation levels in the air, water, soil, or any other material that won’t melt the impact-resistant plastic. It uses two watch batteries and is accurate enough that it can be used by regulators and inspectors checking nuclear sites and other places that house radiological material, such as hospitals. My favorite feature though is the alarm. When the device detects a certain level of radiation exposure (default set to .3 microsieverts/hour) it activates and gives you a tone. This limit is something you can adjust for yourself so you set the threshold to whatever level you need, whether you’re a hospital tech double-checking to make sure the CT scanner has adequate shielding, or you’re wandering a nuclear wasteland after an apocalypse. Is the MIRA Safety Geiger-1 Worth It? While a nuclear apocalypse is extremely unlikely, there are lots of ways the average person can be exposed to radiation. Even flying frequently can expose you to high levels of radiation, so having a device like this Geiger counter that measures such exposure can give you peace of mind, and a whole lot more leverage in a courtroom as well. I love the fact that MIRA Safety has brought a Geiger counter to market that’s small, lightweight, and simple for even an untrained user to operate. I’m all about giving people the tools to keep themselves safe, and this For the average user, the alarm feature is probably the most directly useful, but probably isn’t the one you’re going to use the most. I personally enjoyed just testing random objects with it, just to check the radiation from various things. It’s a nice way to verify that you really are safe from radiation, and is a good thing to have around for your peace of mind if nothing else. And that’s not something to be overlooked. Being free to not worry about this stuff is half the point of prepping for dangerous situations anyway. Knowing you can keep you and your family safe during a crisis is priceless, and that extra comfort is easier to achieve now than ever before with the variety of products out there that can help you be prepared for anything . If you’re like me, and you’re looking to give yourself the best chance of handling real-world disasters, a device like the Geiger-1 makes an awful lot of sense. The fact that this thing is small enough that you can drop it into a shirt pocket along with your pens or what have you is amazing, and I love that you could reasonably EDC this is you work in a profession or live in an area where radiation exposure is a potential risk. I used to do a lot of IT work in hospitals and doctor’s offices, and I wish I could have had something like this back then just to double-check things. If you’re concerned at all about radiation exposure, whether because you live near a power plant and don’t necessarily trust the government when they tell you it’s safe and up to code, or you’re worried about improperly stored government waste, or even radiation exposure in the workplace, the Geiger-1 is an effective, affordable tool that can absolutely help keep you and your loved ones safe. Parting Shots The MIRA Safety Geiger-1 is a tool that helps keep you aware of any danger you may be in from radiation exposure. So if you’re worried about radiation exposure in your water, in your workplace, in your home, or even in your food, it can be used to protect you and your loved ones from what would otherwise be an invisible threat.

The Mossberg 590: A Sturdy and Reliable Shotgun

The Mossberg 590: A Sturdy and Reliable Shotgun

Shotguns have long been considered the equivalent of the popular kid in school when it comes to personal defense weapons that civilians have access to and they still seem to pretty much be the gold standard for self-defense. The Mossberg 590 is a prime example of a reliable and powerful shotgun and it comes in a few different versions that focus on several aspects that gun purchasers might be interested in when looking for a shotgun to acquire. I thought a quick Mossberg 590 review might help you with some important information you need to consider before getting one, so let’s have a look at what this shotgun can do. The Mossberg 590 A1 is one of the most popular models of pump action shotguns available for self-defense at the moment. It is only one of several variations on this type of shotgun alongside other 20” barrel 9 round capacity models like the Mossberg 590 Special Purpose, the Mossberg 590 Tactical and the Mossberg 590 Mariner. It originated from the Mossberg 500 series and it was the only pump shotgun to ever pass a very strict endurance test conducted by the U.S. Military and conform to the Mil-Spec 3443 standards. After it passed a 300 round endurance test that allowed very little room for malfunctions and errors, the Mossberg 590 A1 went on to be adopted by the U.S. Army, Navy, Coast Guard as well as by several Special Forces units. It has also been issued to several state and federal agencies and police departments across the United States. So that can pretty much make it clear just how reliable this shotgun is, especially considering it’s been just as popular since it was first approved back in the 1980s. Mossberg 500 vs 590 Let’s have a quick look at what makes the Mossberg 590 a great shotgun. The 590 A1 has two action bars attached which help move the bolt and a single bolt lug which connects to a steel barrel-extension chamber. It offers the possibility to easily remove the trigger group by removing one pin in order to clean it if needed. It has a tubular magazine that connects to the receiver and that has the barrel collared to it and held in place by a cap. It features both top-tang safety and bolt release controls and has the extension and the barrel connected and button-drawn to the cylinder bore. The Mossberg 590 typically uses 12 gauge ammunition and can be compatible with 3” shells, with the Mossberg 590 A1 fitting both 3” and 2 ¾ “shells. The Mossberg 590 barrel is 20” long and the shotgun can hold 9 rounds in the internal magazine. But referring back to the Mossberg 590 vs 500 debate, it would seem that the 590 models are sturdier than their 500 counterparts and have a different build to them, with a focus on all metal parts. When it comes to the Mossberg 590 A1 there is also a heavy wall barrel that ensures even more durability. And you want to focus on durability for a weapon designed to perform well in rough environments. When it comes to the Mossberg 590 A1 there is also a heavy wall barrel that ensures even more durability. And you want to focus on durability for a weapon designed to perform well in rough environments. Mossberg 590 vs 590A1 When you narrow it down to the specifics, it would seem that the Mossberg 590 A1 is the ultimate model for military use since it shows off a few unique characteristics. Besides the heavy wall barrel, we can also discuss differences in Mossberg 590 accessories that each model can be equipped with. The 590A1 comes fitted with a M7 bayonet that can double as a combat knife but there are some Mossberg 590 bayonet models that will not be compatible with the 590 A1 shotgun since the bayonet lug that the M7 connects to is not identical to lugs found on several other riffles. Since the Mossberg 590 A1 was designed primarily for military use it should come as no surprise that it is one of the most reliable shotguns out there. But as is the case with most good things, it comes with a price and that price is, in this case, weight. It’s quite a heavy firearm to carry for long distances in rough terrain if you’re not very physically fit as it weighs about 7.5 pounds unloaded and measures in at 41” in length. When it comes to the Mossberg 590 pistol grip the A1 model features a firm recoil pad that will come in handy when you fire it since it’s got quite a kick to it. You can have your pick from several available factory installed SpeedFeed stocks but if you like to fire it often and want something that absorbs and reduces the recoil even more you can replace the original stock with one that fits your requirements. Specifics on the Mossberg 590 When it comes to ammo it can basically handle whatever you throw at it depending on how much power you need, but just because it has great features doesn’t mean you don’t have to practice shooting it. The A1 has a Picatinny rail-mounted ghost-ring sight on the rear and an AR-style fiber optic front sight. These features both help with the aim and ensure a fast target acquisition but you still have to focus when you aim it. However, depending on the ammo you want to use, both the accuracy and the pellet spread varies so test it out at the range to decide what works best for you. In terms of what an average Mossberg 590 price range might be, that depends on the model you are looking for and how many accessories you will want to get for it but the shotguns themselves usually cost around $500 to $600. However if you look for one on auction sites you can probably find a Mossberg 590 for sale at an even lower price depending on its features. The accessories you can add to it might set you back a few hundred dollars more if you want to customize your shotgun but the weapon itself is very affordable considering how reliable and powerful it is.

Experience WWIIs First True Combat Rifles through .22 Replicas

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d27ebfdb_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d27ebfdb_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } German Sport Guns' StG44 (above) and Chiappa's M1-22 (below). There is one big barrier in collecting World War II era firearms — the price tag. But high quality .22 replicas have made stocking your gun safe with the finest guns of the Allies and Axis accessible. The First Assault Weapons As currently defined, an “Assault Rifle” is considered to be a lightweight battle arm firing a cartridge of intermediate power (somewhere between a pistol cartridge and a full-blown traditional battle rifle cartridge like the .30-06) capable of being fired in a semi-automatic or full automatic mode from a high capacity detachable box magazine. Most people consider the German StG44-Sturmgewehr 44, literally “storm (or assault) rifle, which fired the 7.92mm Kurz (short) cartridge to be the world’s first assault rifle under that definition. It was an outstanding weapon for that time, and was likely to have been at least in part, the progenitor of the Soviet AK-47. Fortunately for the world, Adolph Hitler, besides being a psychopath, was also a micromanaging psychopath. He believed that since the M98K bolt action rifle had been good enough for him in the First World War, it was good enough for his troops 25 years later in the Seccond World War. Development of this weapon had to be kept under wraps from him until it was perfected AND Germany was in such dire straits that a weapon of this type was needed to turn the tide of battle(s). Fortunately again, the allies had so severely interfered with the ability of Germany to manufacture what it needed that not enough of this revolutionary arm could be produced to have much effect on the outcome of the war. But there was another assault rifle that was invented before the Stg44 that made an impact, before it was even envisioned as a weapon of this type. Our very own M1 carbine. As many of you know, the M1 Carbine was designed originally to replace the .45 pistol as a more effective, yet easily carried weapon for rear echelon types, or specialty troops such as mortar crews. It provided much longer range accuracy and firepower than the great .45 did. But it was never intended to be fielded as a frontline. Or was it? Well, yes and no. There were other specialized troops that needed a weapon that was lighter and more compact than the M1 Garand or Thompson-so paratroopers were in line for the weapon-which was initially designed to have a selective fire feature. Apparently that feature was deleted by the military as being too costly, or slowing the initial development and fielding of the new weapon. "German Sport Guns" ' StG44 might be a .22, but hasn't lost its intimidation factor. It wasn’t until the War was drawing to a close that conversion kits were provided to make the M1 Carbines in the field full auto capable, while production of the M2 select fire carbine was undertaken stateside. The late addition of select fire capability was a direct response to our encounters with the few German troops that had been equipped with the StG44. So technically we COULD have fielded the select fire M2 carbine much earlier than we did, beating the German’s to the punch But typical stodgy military thinking may have also been involved in detouring the select fire capability as unnecessary. I say we won the race on a technicality. Related GunDigest Articles Magnum Research .22 Rifles Now Dressed in a New Stock SHOT Show: Great New Rifles for 2017 We definitely won on the intermediate cartridge concept. While the .30 carbine cartridge is often thought of as a wimp of a round, it really isn’t. Launching a 110gr. bullet at over 1990 fps, and developing 967 ft. lbs. of muzzle energy-basically three times that of the 9mm at the muzzle, it is certainly nothing I would want to get hit with. By contrast, the StG44’s 7.92×33 Kurtz, clearly the predecessor of the 7.62×39 AK47 round, launched a 125 grain bullet at 2250 fps for a muzzle energy of 1408 ft. lbs. Again, while the .30 Carbine lacks the ballistic potential of the 7.92 Kurtz, it is clearly in a ballistic class well above standard handgun cartridges. Again, the .30 Carbine qualifies as an assault rifle round, not only because of its ballistics, but because it was used as such throughout three plus Wars. .22 caliber makeovers The problem with both these weapons and their cartridges is that they aren’t available at reasonable cost or any cost that the average shooter can afford. Try $20,000 plus for an original StG44. Original M1’s in shootable condition are well into the $2000 range. While there are outstanding newly manufactured M1’s available from Kahr/Auto-Ordnance, there is still the issue of ammo cost. .30 Carbine ammo is somewhat pricey. Ball ammo runs around $23 for 50 rounds. Not horrible, but not cheap. Fortunately, the ability to have and shoot these two old war horses (or at least their stand-ins) at a very reasonable cost for both guns and ammo has arrived via two companies who are heavily invested in the burgeoning .22LR replica market. The Italian manufacturer Chiappa has given us the M1-22 .22LR M1 Carbine (sold through Century Arms and now available in a 9mm model), while Germany’s GSG (German Sport Guns) imported through American Tactical has given us the .22LR StG44. Both these guns are worth their fun, and maybe hunting and defensive weight, in gold. The .22 replica market has been a beautiful thing. The replicas I have worked with are often indistinguishable (without close examination by a trained eye) from the real thing. Remember the old .22LR M16 “replica” from the 1980’s? The only thing that vaguely resembled an M16 was the fact that it had a carry handle/sight and a triangular handguard. Any other resemblance To a real M16 was purely coincidental. Chiappa's M1-22 has the potential to be a slick camp rifle. Chiappa's M1-22 All that has changed. Let’s start with a closer look at the “American” entrant. The M1-22 is a dead ringer in the wood stock version to late war production “low wood” M1 Carbines. The stock is a very walnut appearing hardwood in a natural style low-gloss finish. The barrel and bolt are made of steel, while low stress components are polymer. Seriously, there really is a difference between polymer and plastic-quality polymer is very durable and it works well in terms of appearance and function on the M1-22. The late war style also features a faux bayonet lug (I tried a real M1 Carbine bayonet on the gun, it didn’t fit but it looked good). The magazine release is the correct style, and is in the correct location. The safety is the rotating lever style that replaced the original push button to avoid confusion with the magazine release button on early military M1’s. The charging handle can be locked to the rear with the small button found at the rear, just as the real M1. The bolt also stays open on the last shot. The polymer magazine has the same profile as the original and is entirely enclosed due to its 10 round capacity limit. No loading assist button is needed. The magazine locks in place in the same manner as the original. The rear sight is the same style as the late model adjustable carbine sight and the front sight is standard M1, plain blue-no fancy light gathering inserts. There is a slot in the stock that would accommodate an original carbine oiler and sling combo should you wish to add it, although the M1-22 is certainly no burden to carry as is.

Trulock Introduces New Choke Tube for the Stevens 555

Trulock, the American manufacturer of premium choke tubes for shotguns, has developed a new line of 12-gauge chokes for the Stevens 555 O/U shotgun. For the Stevens 555, Trulock makes 12-gauge tubes in cylinder through turkey constrictions in three styles. The first is a flush-style choke tube. The second is an extended-tube style with a black oxide finish (like other chokes in Trulock’s industry-leading Precision Hunter lines). The third is an extended “bright” choke designed for sporting clays. All the extended choke tubes for the Stevens 555 are also available in ported versions. George Trulock has been making choke tubes since 1981. Trulock Chokes are designed for specific guns and specific applications. Trulock Chokes are known by hunters and shooting sport enthusiasts to be world-class with respect to function, quality and durability. As part of that quality assurance, all Trulock Choke Tubes are designed, built and field tested at Trulock’s U.S. facilities in Georgia. Trulock doesn’t release a new choke tube for sale until they are sure it works. They’re sure it works because Trulock tests the chokes, firing rounds through prototypes, and adjusting design parameters as necessary until the choke tube delivers the best possible results. It’s a time-tested process for Trulock, which now makes over 2,000 different choke tubes. Aside from wanting to make the best possible product, "Trulock Choke Tubes" takes such pains on product development and testing because they fully stand behind their products, with a guarantee that effectively eliminates risk for the customer. If you buy a choke from them and aren’t satisfied for any reason, then within 60 days of purchase you can return it to them for either a replacement or a full refund of your money – your choice. To learn more about Trulock and their range of choke tubes, check out website at www.trulockchokes.com . The staff at Trulock Chokes prides itself on providing excellent service and an excellent line of products. In the event you are not completely satisfied with your purchase you can return it for a refund or exchange within 60 days from the date of purchase – with other firms, the moment you open it, you own it. For more information, please visit WWW.TRULOCKCHOKES.COM

Summary

When building a custom AR-15 upper receiver , installing your barrel is actually one of the easier things to complete. Make sure and read the article that covers what tools you will need to build your AR-15 upper receiver and then grab the following items: your barrel, your barrel nut, torque wrench, barrel nut wrench and AeroShell 33ms grease . This shows how some may choose to place the barrel directly into the vise.